How Berkeley Voted: 2016 June Primary Election

June 24, 2016                                                                         by Rob Wrenn

Bernie won Berkeley!

Photography Intern

Bernie Sanders won Berkeley in the Democratic presidential primary with 54.4% of the vote to 45.2% for Hillary Clinton, not a huge margin. Clinton did best in the City’s wealthiest areas, the northeast Berkeley hills in District 6, in the hills above Claremont Ave. in District 8, and in the windy street precincts in the northern part of District 5. These areas have historically favored “moderate” candidates in local Berkeley election.

Sanders swept the flatlands, except for two precincts in District 1, winning South Berkeley, West Berkeley and the central part of the city and sweeping the areas near the UC campus, Southside, Northside and Downtown by large margins. He did well in the areas where progressive candidates usually fare well in local elections.

Results by city and precinct:

Screen Shot 2016-06-24 at 7.42.36 PM.png

Note: Student precincts consists of precincts in the area south of campus between Dwight Way and campus and 1 consolidated precinct on the near Northside, that includes the Foothill dorm. Berkeley results include write-ins; Oakland, Albany and Emeryville and county results are based only on vote for candidates on the ballot.

Turnout

Turnout Turnout in Berkeley was up this year compared to the uncontested 2012 California Democratic presidential primary, but was down compared to 2008 when Clinton ran against Obama for the nomination. In that hotly contested 2008 Democratic Presidential primary, which took place in February that year, turnout was 64.5% in Berkeley, with Obama defeating Clinton by a huge margin: 27,352 to 11,505. This year turnout was 58.0%.

Student turnout was very low, which is not surprising given that the primary took place after most undergraduates had left town for the summer. No doubt some students opted to register and vote in the hometowns they returned to when the semester ended.

This year, 833,803 people were registered to vote in Alameda County, and 49.3%, turned out to vote countywide. Of 480,475 registered Democrats in the county 59% voted. In addition, a little over table 140,000 Decline to State (DTS) voters cast Democratic ballots.

In Berkeley, 45,933 ballots were cast. In the 2014 November gubernatorial election, 40,301 votes were cast by Berkeley voters. 47,303 voted in the presidential primary election in 2008. A record 66,703 votes were cast in the 2008 November presidential election.

Turnout may have been dampened by media reports before the election that declared that Clinton had enough delegates, with super delegates included, to secure the nomination.

Turnout in Berkeley, Selected Elections, 2008-2016

Screen Shot 2016-06-24 at 7.46.55 PM

Trump gets less than 1% in Berkeley

The vast majority of the Berkeley voters’ ballots cast, 42,476, were cast in the Democratic primary. Donald Trump received 454 votes in the Republican primary; Kasich got 306. So Trump was supported by slightly less than 1% of the voters who cast ballots in Berkeley.

9th State Senate District

Former Assemblymember and District 1 councilmember Nancy Skinner easily beat Sandré Swanson in Berkeley, crushing him with 24,130 votes (62.6%) to Swanson’s 9596 votes(24.9% ). Other candidates got 4799 votes. Skinner swept every district in Berkeley. In the Oakland portion of the 9th District, Skinner beat Swanson by a much narrower margin of 44,012 to 40,650. Skinner and Swanson will face each other again in November.

Contra Costa County had not finished counting ballots as of June 22, but the 9th district result to date, including votes reported so far in Contra Costa County portions of the district is 48.0% for Skinner and 30.6% for Swanson.

lfranklin

June 9, 2016

 

 

Berkeley Citizens Action – June Newsletter

Competing Minimum Wage proposals, Police Review Commission with teeth and more.  Location: Council Chambers, 2135 Martin Luther King Jr. Way

Competing Minimum Wage measures on the November Ballot?
After years of intense debate on minimum wage, we face a chance of having two competing minimum wage ballot measures this November. After a resident initiated measure, the Council majority placed a competing measure that will likely cause serious voter confusion and lead to the failure of increasing to an equitable minimum wage.

Kriss Worthington writes that he has proposed for the June 14th Council meeting that Council adopt its own minimum wage proposal as an ordinance rather than create voter confusion in November. 

Mike Donaldson from SEIU and the Central Labor Council has asked for support from BCA member for their minimum wage initiative, which would lift the minimum wage to $15 on October 1st, 2017. He explains that their measure means minimum  of more than $3,000 a year in income for a full-time worker, more sick leave, fewer restrictions, better wage theft protections, more income for youth, less confusion, and does not allow the City Council to arbitrarily change provisions. Attached please find links to the minimum wage flyer for June 14th council meeting and their community minimum wage initiative.

Other items of interest on the June 14 docket:
33.  Petition President Barack Obama to Grant Clemency to Leonard Peltier
35.  Honor the East Bay Sanctuary Covenant for its 3000th Asylum Grant
50.  Ballot Measure to Lower the Voting Age of School Board Elections to Sixteen
   …and many more!

Please attend June 14, but don’t wait until then to contact the mayor and council about items you support or oppose on the council agenda: Here is the link to the city council agenda for next Tuesday, and the emails for council and city clerk: council@cityofberkeley.infoclerk@cityofberkeley.info

Game-changer for police accountability in Berkeley?

Submitted by George Lippman
Item 52, from Kriss Worthington is a proposal for a November ballot initiative to establish a true Police Commission with teeth. Unlike the current Police Review Commission, the new body would have full oversight powers over the BPD. Location:  2134 MLK Jr. Way, Berkeley. Click here to see the proposal

Item 52 would refer the current Oakland community proposal for a similar Police Commission to the city manager to draft a charter amendment to be considered by the voters. There is not yet Berkeley-specific language, and the floor is open for your ideas.

Please review the item in the agenda packet including the Oakland language and come out June 14 to voice your support, giving input into how the Commission should function.

You might consider these questions:
* How is the current role of the PRC insufficient to provide oversight and transparency for Berkeley police?
* Would the Oakland model provide sufficient independence for the commission?
* Is the Selection Panel described in the model ordinance the appropriate way to select some of the commissioners?
* Are the scope and procedures of investigations appropriate?

Beyond the June 14 meeting, if the referral does pass, I believe there will have to be a second vote (July?) to review the City Manager’s language and decide whether to put it on the November ballot.  There will be a need for community mobilization at that point, and for a strong campaign through the fall to win the vote.

Other upcoming accountability initiatives:
*  Racial profiling:  new statistics from this year have been released by the BPD which shows that the biased patterns revealed last year continue into 2016.  The PRC has established a subcommittee to look into this issue, and community people are invited to participate.
*  Body cameras:  new policy draft will be finalized at the June 8 PRC meeting, 7pm, South Berkeley Senior Center.
*  Crowd control:  ongoing PRC subcommittee meetings on use of force, mutual aid, etc.
*  Privacy/surveillance ordinance, using the ACLU template as modified for Berkeley (as in Oakland, Richmond, Santa Clara County etc.)

 

Come to tonight’s Berkeley Council meeting on Housing, Tonight Tuesday May 17

Talking Points for speaking out or an email
Subject: Affordable Housing, May 17 meeting
Dear Mayor Bates and Members of the Berkeley City Council,
     The City of Berkeley is facing a housing affordability crisis. To address this crisis, the City Council must adopt an affordable housing funding plan. An achievable and effective plan could add at least $10 million each year to the Housing Trust Fund. The City should commit to measures that will help fund at least 100 more units of affordable housing every year. In addition to housing impact fees, please support the following measures:
1. A ballot measure to increase the business license tax on landlords with five or more units in Berkeley, with an increase sufficient to generate at least $4 million a year in new revenue for the Housing Trust Fund. Please don’t support watered down alternatives such as what is being proposed by landlord lobbyists.
2.Taxing short-term rentals like AirBnB and making sure the revenue is committed to the Housing Trust Fund
3. Using 25% of any Property Transfer Tax revenues over $10.5 million for affordable housing by placing the money in the Housing Trust Fund.
4. A countywide affordable housing bond on the November 2016 ballot
These measures would begin to produce adequate funding for the housing we need for families, students and working people.  We urge you as our City Council representatives to adopt these measures to both increase the resources in the Housing Trust Fund and to guarantee additional affordable housing in the future.

Results of Endorsement Meeting held by BPA- BCA-BTU on Saturday April 30th

Endorsement Results:

Mayor: Jesse Arreguin               District 2: Nanci Armstrong-Temple

District 3: Ben Bartlett                District 5: Sophie Hahn

District 6: Fred Dodsworth

 

Mayor: 109 valid ballots counted, one invalid. Jesse Arreguin achieved 60% threshhold on first round of rank choice counting

Jesse Arreguin 65%                         Kriss Worthington 24%

Mike Lee: 4%                                     Ben Gould: 3%

Write ins: 2 for Kate Harrison, 1 for Moni Law                                      No endorsement: 2%

Total votes for Jesse Arreguin for 1st, 2nd or 3rd choice: 97. Total votes for Kriss Worthington for 1st, 2nd or 3rd choice: 74

 

District 2 City Council – 98 valid ballots. Nanci Armstrong-Temple achieved 61% after ranked choices were counted

Nanci Armstrong-Temple: 61%          Cheryl Davila: 26%          No Endorsement    13%

 

District 3 City Council – 103 valid ballots  (3 invalid ballots): Endorsement goes to Ben Bartlett, who achieved 87% on first round of rank choice counting

Ben Bartlett: 87%                          Mark Coplan: 12%               Deborah Matthews: 1%                     No endorsement   0

 

District 5 City Council – 85 Valid ballots: Sophie Hahn achieved 78.9% on first round of rank choice counting

Sophie Hahn 78 91%                Stephen Murphy: 6%               No endorsement: 2%

 

District 6 City Council – 94 valid ballots, 2 invalid: Endorsement goes to Fred Dodsworth achieved 78.9% on first round of rank choice counting

Fred Dodsworth: 78%               Isabelle Gaston: 9%                 Susan Wengraf: 5%                             No Endorsement: 9%

Ten Candidates have requested progressive endorsement for Mayor and City Council

These Ten Candidates have submitted questionnaires about their candidacy and will speak at the April 30th Endorsement Meeting. Join us Saturday April 30th from 1:30 to 5 at the Youth Adult Project (YAP) at 1730 Oregon Street. Click here to download the current flyer.

To vote in the endorsement meeting you must be a member of BPA or Berkeley Citizens Action or the Berkeley Tenants Union by April 24th. Each group will have membership lists at the registration tables at the event. Members can bring dues current there. No one will be turned away due to lack of funds. If needed, as during registration.

All candidates who are registered with the city or requested consideration were sent the following questionnaire. Do Candidates support our Progressive Agenda & Housing Platform? See their responses summarized in this corrected document here. Below you may click on candidates name’s to access their full responses.

Mayor:  Jesse Arreguin    Ben Gould     Mike Lee    Kriss Worthington

City Council District 2:  Cheryl K. Davila        Nanci Armstrong-Temple

City Council District 3:   Ben Bartlett              Mark Coplan

City Council District 5:   Sophie Hahn

City Council District 6:   Fred Dodsworth

Click here for Draft Voting Rules and Ballots. This will be updated when finalized.

The following local measures are under way for the November 2016 ballot: Local measures & Rent Board Slate Update.

 

Endorse Progressive Candidates for Mayor and Council on Saturday April 30, 1:30-5pm

YAP entrance

Berkeley Citizens Action (BCA), Berkeley Progressive Alliance (BPA) and Berkeley Tenants Union are holding a joint meeting to endorse candidates for Mayor and for Council Districts 2 (Southwest Berkeley), 3 (South Berkeley), 5 (North Berkeley) and 6 (Northeast Berkeley hills).

Meeting Location: The Young Adult Project (YAP) Recreation Center’s gymnasium, 1730 Oregon Street. YAP is located below MLK on Oregon, next to baseball diamond, near the Tarea Hall Pittman (South Branch) Library.

Time: Saturday, April 30, Registration: 1:30pm. Event: 2-5.

This year’s local election will take place on November 8, 2016, the same day as the federal and state elections. This is an important election. We hope to elect a progressive majority to Berkeley’s City Council.

At the meeting you’ll hear from candidates for Berkeley City Council and Mayor; vote to select the best of these candidates for endorsement; discuss measures which maybe on the November ballot; and plan election campaigning. Endorsed candidates will receive support from BCA and BPA in their campaigns.
To vote at our endorsement meeting, you must be a member of either BCA or BPA by April 24. You may not join either organization on the day of the meeting if you wish to vote. Everyone gets one vote, even if you are a member of both organizations. Find instructions for joining at end of this announcement.

Candidates: If you are running for City Council or Mayor, or are seriously thinking about running, and would like our endorsement, contact us by e-mail at berkeleyprogressivealliance@gmail.com,  or BCA at info@berkeleycitizensaction.org.  Candidates will be asked to complete a questionnaire. Completed questionnaires will be made available to members or BPA and BCA in advance of the meeting and will also be available at the meeting.

BCA Membership: Past BCA members can pay at the door or online. Membership is $35 yearly, $10 low income. If you wish to join BCA, click here to join online or send us your name, e-mail address, street address, phone and payment to: Berkeley Citizens Action, PO Box 0032, Berkeley, CA  94709 by April 24th. For more information about BCA, visit: http://berkeleycitizensaction.org.

BPA Membership: BPA is a new organization. To join, send your name, e-mail address, street address and phone (optional), and your City Council district if you know it, and your first year’s dues, $10 to:  Berkeley Progressive Alliance, PO Box 2961, Berkeley, CA 94702. If you are a member by April 24, but have yet not paid dues, you may pay at the meeting (by check  or cash).
Membership in the Berkeley Progressive Alliance is open to any resident of Berkeley who is supportive of our mission statement and in general agreement with our agenda, which is a work in progress. Affordable housing is one of the key issues we are working on. Take a look at our Affordable Housing Platform on our website.
For more information about BPA, visit: http://berkeleyprogressivealliance.org

If you have questions, e-mail us at berkeleyprogressivealliance@gmail.com or info@berkeleycitizensaction.org

Follow-up to 3/6 Housing for the Rest of Us

It was a tremendous event, more than 125 people attended Housing for the Rest of Us and heard Don Goldmacher introduce BPA and Kate Harrison present our housing platform. Max Anderson spoke of the housing situation and Ben Bartlett shared his agenda for addressing housing inequity in Berkeley. John Selawsky announced the Tenant Convention and landlord tax, Sophie Hanh, Jesse Arreguin, Kriss Worthington and many others shared their ideas. Here are some photos and links to articles about the event.  Stay tuned for ways to get involved in creating and protecting housing for the 99%, especially for the lowest income residents of Berkeley.

Max speaks at BPA event

Max speaks at BPA event, photo by Paola Laverde

Kate Harrison, BPA co-chair, is moderating the forum/ by Timothy Dawson

 

Sophie Hahn speaks at BPA Housing for the Rest of Us

Sophie Hahn speaks

 

Sophie Hahn and Jesse Townley, candidates for District 5

Sophie Hahn and Jesse Townley, candidates for District 5, photo by Paola Laverde

Housing for the Rest of Us

Introducing the Berkeley Progressive Alliance and their Affordable Housing Platform

Sunday, March 6th, 2 to 4:30 pm
South Berkeley Senior Center, 2939 Ellis Street at Ashby

Oxford Plaza downtown Berkeley

Oxford Plaza, energy efficient affordable housing built in 2009 at a comfortable scale. Since 2009, almost no affordable housing has been built, for lack of committed funding for the Berkeley Housing Trust Fund

Solve the Affordable Housing Crisis:

Berkeley could build a hundred units of affordable housing a year, if we raise funds for the Housing Trust Fund. Hear about practical solutions that will raise the money needed. Prepare for the 2016 Election by making plans to elect a mayor, city council members, and rent board commissioners who will represent all of us, not just the 1%.

Speakers include:

  • Max Anderson ‐ Berkeley City Councilmember District 3 (South Berkeley)
  • Ben Bartlett ‐ member, Berkeley Planning Commission and District 3 City Council candidate
  • Kate Harrison, Berkeley Progressive Alliance and National State Politics chair of the Wellstone Democratic Renewal Club

Refreshments and childcare provided (RSVP for childcare to:papermasterc@gmail.com)

Sponsored by: Berkeley Progressive Alliance, Berkeley Citizens Action, Better Berkeley Working Group, Berkeley Tenants Union, and Grassroots House

h​ttp://berkeleyprogressivealliance.org/

Address: PO Box 2961, Berkeley, CA 94702

Email: b​erkeleyprogressivealliance@gmail.com

Follow-up to Affordable Housing Teach-In

housingcrisisteachin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo from Berkeleyside by  Kathleen Costanza.

Thank you for attending the Teach-in on the Housing Affordability Crisis in Berkeley.
As activists working for fair housing for all Berkeley residents, we will sendyou emails
now and then about important issues.

The Housing Teach-In was videoed. Here is a link to all the talks that day.
Each speaker can be seen separately or all of them together.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5SsD0Q02p8&list=PLS2O9Gttsg5cwvAjJi-VMccKBLLu3-Iun

There is an important council meeting on Tuesday, December 15th.
We hope you can come and speak out. See below for more information.

SPEAK OUT FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING AT THE BERKELEY CITY COUNCIL
Tuesday, December 15, 2015 at 7:00 P.M.

The Council is again considering actions for creating more affordable housing in Berkeley.  We activists must be there to speak. Let’s demand Council action on proposals made at the November 22 Affordable Housing Teach In.

The Agenda: More Funding for Affordable Housing

Three actions the City Council must take to generate $10 million and fund around 100 affordable units each year:

Increase the business license tax on large landlords in Berkeley; each 1% increase in the tax could bring in $2 to $3 million annually.

Increase the housing impact fees on market-rate development to at least the $34,000  recommended by the Nexus study . Developers should be allowed to avoid paying the fee by providing 20% affordable units (5 affordable units for every 20 market rate units built).

Tax short term rentals such as AirBnB rentals and use the new revenue for affordable housing.

These funds could also be used to create affordable home ownership through
limited equity coops and other resident-controlled cooperative housing. In addition, the Council
must:

Provide $1 million in loans to non-profit housing developers to finalize their plans for affordable housing and allow them to apply for available federal grants and tax credits. These funds are less than 25% of the surplus the City currently has available.

We must maintain the supply of existing Rental Housing. We need to insure that  affordable housing is not taken off market. Ask the Council to:

Strengthen Berkeley’s Demolition Ordinance to protect the existing supply of rent controlled housing.  Each rent controlled unit must be replaced — one for one — with housing that is permanently affordable to low and very low income households.
Continue to support reassessment by ZAB of demolishing 18 rent controlled units at 2631 Durant. There is no provision for inclusion of a similar number of replacement units in the proposed building.
Improve monitoring of affordable inclusionary units in market rate housing developments, create a City-maintained waiting list and establish priorities for housing those who currently live or work in Berkeley.

Mike yielders needed here as well.  If you can’t attend the meeting, please write to the Council to express your support for making funding and maintenance of affordable housing a priority.

Send e-mail to council@cityofberkeley.info; write “affordable housing” in the subject line.
Individual council e-mail is as follows:

Mayor Tom Bates        mayor@CityofBerkeley.info
Council District
Linda Maio            1    lmaio@CityofBerkeley.info
Darryl Moore         2    dmoore@CityofBerkeley.info
Max Anderson       3    manderson@CityofBerkeley.info
Jesse Arreguin       4    jarreguin@CityofBerkeley.info
Laurie Capitelli      5    lcapitelli@CityofBerkeley.info
Susan Wengraft      6    swengraf@CityofBerkeley.info
Kriss Worthington  7    kworthington@CityofBerkeley.info
Lori Droste             8    ldroste@CityofBerkeley.info]

From activists in the Berkeley Progessive Alliance, Sustainable Berkeley Coalition, Berkeley Citizens Action, the Berkeley Tenants Union, CALPIRG, the Berkeley NAACP, Black Student Union of Berkeley City College, and the Better Berkeley Working Group.

CONTACT
Kate Harrison
Owner/Principal
Kate Harrison Consulting
kate@kateharrisonconsulting.com
www.kateharrisonconsulting.com | (510) 593-9591

 

Great Ideas on Improving Berkeley Housing Situation from Participants at the Teach-In

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Development attendees like

  • 6 stories
  • Infill, Affordable housing that blends with neighborhoods architecturally
  • In lieu versus inclusionary: some say no in-lieu of units in new developments, one asks for atleast 30% low and middle income units in new development; one likes integrating low and moderate income housing; one recommends city consider a range of income levels cumulatively equivalent to 50% of AMI
  • Preserve and protect historic buildings in downtown
  • Limited equity housing, coops; coops of large buildings, not just homes; community land trusts

Ways to raise money to build affordable housing

  • Tax on excess rents, windfall profits
  • City funds
  • Tax/limit short term rentals
  • Fines/fees for university for student impact
  • fines/fees for megacorps for regional impact
  • Tax landlords for public use, use for the homeless
  • Sue state for redevelopment money to recover portion of taxes
  • Seek grants for disabled housing near Ed Roberts
  • 5% transfer tax
  • Tax for pied-a-terre, 2ndary homes
  • Huge foreign purchase tax
  • Google bus tax

Recommendations for help for low income tenants

  • Set aside revenue streams for affordable housing
  • Increased subsidies for low income tenants, local Section 8 program
  • Matching savings plans for housing ownership, Loans to tenants to buy buildings–acquisition program, city office to centralize subidy/loan info; Local Stake system that gives local residents including homeless housing benefits for long residence/participation in the community
  • Increase awareness of issues for renters/voters, and 1:1 with council members to fully understand 360 degree perspective on housing issues instead of profits /bottom line
  • Build youth hostels
  • Build fellowship housing for staff of non-profits, arts, education
  • Tax relief for landlords with long term tenants in rent controlled units
  • Tiny house/Camping area for temp housing of homeless

Legislation needed to protect/ increase affordable housing

  • Pass highest rate for inclusionary housing and highest in-lieu fee
  • See if rent control can be extended to buildings built since 1982
    Require payment of in-lieu fees during permitting process, rather than when the occupancy permit is issued
  • Revoke Ellis act
  • Eliminate Costa-Hawkins, create stronger rent control, end vacancy decontrol. penalize landlords for housing discrimination (preferring students with their rapid turnover), by resetting rent back to original level)
  • Pass robust demolition ordinance, No demolitions of existing rent controlled housing. One for One replacement of demolished rent controlled units
  • Tax on foreign buyers to reduce housing speculation
  • Vacancy Penalty (fee for vacant properties to cover costs incurred by city for policing, clean up, degradation of community)
  • Make housing a civil right, so people can sue if they are homeless
  • Rent control for local businesses in return for minimum wage
  • Pressure university to reduce dorm fees so they are preferred to private housing
  • Prevent Plan Bay Area/ABAG from removing anti-displacement language. Raise awareness of this threat
  • End racist housing policies

Outreach needed

  • Elect New Council and new commission members who are champions of affordable housing
  • Disrupt developer “Welcome to our project” meetings.
  • End racist housing policies

Other recommendations

  • Encourage collective eating halls to enable kitchen free housing, or subscription service to local residents
  • Better transit: Provide shuttles to reduce need for parking; improve public transit to dilute gentrified areas; Provide car-share in any building with limited parking
  • Buy city-owned properties in North Berkeley to increase density in luxury area
  • Moratorium on other buildings
  • lower “rent taking” on items of mass use to free income for housing, such as public phone, internet, water, electricity, gasd, cable tv, mail, bulk food
  • Encourage shared office workspaces to favor housing over office space; encourage mixed housing in commercial buildings
  • @BTU: clarify who is “good for housing” so people will stop falling for fake housing promises from developers and Silicon Valley libertarians. The current council is bamboozling tenants by promising market drive housing
  • Stop letting regional interests dictate housing policy
  • Build affordable housing that blends with neighborhoods
  • Focus on local employment, get high paying employers to look for local talent