Berkeley City Councilmember Voting Score Card


Links for reference:


BCA Endorsements for Measures & Propositions

Below see a list of the local Measures and statewide Propositions on the Ballot in November, as endorsed by the membership of Berkeley Citizens Action. Click HERE for a PDF listing of all the measures and descriptions.

Endorsed on Sept 10, 2016

City Measures

Measure                                                               Position                              comment

T1 (infrastructure)                                              YES                                    94.4% discussion

U1 City Rental Unit Business License Tax       YES                                    By Consent

V1 Gann Appropriations Limit                          YES                                    By Consent

W1 Redistricting Commission                           YES                                    By Consent

Y1 Youth Voting                                                   YES                                    By Consent

X1 Public Financing of Campaigns                     YES                                    By Consent

Z1 Low Income Housing Authorization             YES                                    By Consent

AA Rent Board Ordinance                                    YES                                    By Consent

BB Business Backed Min.Wage Ordinance        NO                                      94.4 %

CC Citizens Choice Min Wage Ordinance           NO                                      64.7%

DD Big Landlords Bad Rental License                 NO                                      By Consent

E1 Berkeley Schools Funding                               YES                                    By Consent


Other Local Measures

A1 Alameda County Affordable Housing bond       YES                                    By Consent

C1 AC Transit                                                                 YES                                    By Consent

RR (BART Bond                                                               YES                                    By Consent


Statewide Propositions
51 School Bonds                                                             YES                                    66.7%

52 State Fees on Hospitals                                            YES                                    66.7%

53 Revenue Bonds                                                          NO                                      By Consent

54 Legislature 72 hour hold                                           NO                                      66.7% a

55 Tax Extension for Education and Healthcare          YES                                    By Consent

56 Cigarettes                                                                      YES                                    By Consent

57 Juvenile Criminal Sentences                                       YES                                    By Consent

58 Bilingual Education                                                      YES                                    By Consent

59 Overturn Citizens United                                            YES                                    By Consent

60 Adult Films                                                                  NO ENDORSEMENT            62.5%

61 Prescription Drugs                                                      YES                                    By Consent

62 Death Penalty Repeal                                                  YES                                    By Consent

63 Automatic Weapons Ammunition                            YES                                    72.2%

64 Marijuana                                                                    YES                                       By Consent

65 Plastic Bag Fees                                                           NO                                      By Consent

66 Reform Death Penalty                                                  NO                                      By Consent

67 Reaffirm Plastic Bag Ban                                              YES                                    By Consent

Measures and Propositions Endorsement Forum – Saturday, Sept 10 from 1 to 3 pm at the South Berkeley Senior Center, 2939 Ellis St., at Ashby

Join members of Berkeley Citizens Action and Berkeley Tenants Union to discuss the measures and propositions on the November Ballot and make endorsements. The following are the recommendations by BCA Steering Committee members:

Berkeley City Measures

T1 – Infrastructure & Facilities Bond  – YES, with reservations: Permits $100 million in bonds to fix sidewalks, storm drains, streets, parks, Senior & Rec Centers, etc. For a property assessed at $600,000, increases taxes by $128/yr. Two commissions, Public Works & Parks & Waterfront will obtain community input. Some Steering Committee members want more specificity and accountability about how funds spent. No argument filed against. Needs 66.667% to Pass.

U1 – Rental Unit Business License Tax – City Sponsored: YES, YES, YES – Real Affordable Housing Rental Tax. Funds affordable housing, protects tenants from homelessness. Written with community & housing advocate input, has broad support, as real estate investors earned more than $100 million per year in windfall profits. Increases rental property tax about $30 per unit per month. Housing Advisory Commission to oversee how $$ is spent. Provides many exemptions: landlords with only 4 or less units, affordable-housing nonprofits, subsidized low-income units, units with long term tenants, new units for 12 years (to encourage new construction), landlord hardship. Increases cannot be passed to tenants. Conflicts with Measure DD; if both pass, the one with more votes prevails. No argument filed against. Needs 50%+ 1 to pass.

V1 – GANN Appropriations Limit – YES: City must get voter approval to spend interest earned from investing previously passed taxes, for next 4 years. No Brainer to approve this. No argument filed against. Needs 50%+ 1 to pass.

W1 – Citizens Redistricting Commission – YES: Creates independent body to determine district boundaries, randomly selected from volunteers; won’t be appointed by politicians. No argument filed against. Needs 50%+ 1 to pass.

X1 – Public Campaign Financing – YES: Provides candidates for mayor and city council with 6X matching for funds from donors, if they accept new donations limits (maximum $50). Candidates get up to $120,000 for mayor & $40,000 for council runs. Maplight proposal, heard at BCA forum. No argument filed against. Needs 50%+ 1 to pass.

Y1 – Youth Voting – YES: Lets 16 & 17 year olds vote for school board candidates, if no city $$ is spent & city elections can still be consolidated with county ballots. No argument filed against. Needs 50%+ 1 to pass.

Z1 – Low Income Housing Authorization – YES: Constitution says cities must get periodic voter approval to develop, construct, or buy up to 500 units of housing for low-income tenants. No argument filed against. Needs 50%+ 1 to pass.

AA – Rent Board Ordinance – YES: Increases tenant protections: delays “no fault” owner-move-in (OMI) evictions (OMIs) of families with school-age children until end of school year. Voters have required landlords in OMIs to provide relocation help of $4,500 to low-income tenants, but not other tenants, since 2000. Measure AA would update this amount to $15,000, and require that it be paid to all tenant households, plus an additional $5,000 for low-income, disabled, age 60 or older, or long-term (since 1998) tenants. No argument filed in opposition. Needs Simple Majority to Pass.

Minimum Wage Compromise Update: The following 2 measures have been superseded by a late compromise approved by City Council Wednesday, August 31.  This new agreement gets to $15 per hour by October 1, 2018, with yearly inflation increases; allows up to 72 hours of paid sick leave; ensures employees receive service charges and provides for a flexible youth-job-training wage for non-profits. Advocates of Measures BB and CC then went to court – the ballot arguments & rebuttals for both BB & CC are to be pulled. The arguments against both measures will now ask you “to support the City Council’s progressive minimum wage ordinance BY VOTING NO ON BOTH MEASURES BB & CC, thus enabling the Council ordinance to be the governing law.”

BB – Minimum Wage – Council and Business sponsored – NO: Raises minimum wage to $15 by October 2019, with annual cost-of-living (COLA) increases; excludes youth & job-training agencies; credits to $1.50 of employer-paid employee medical benefits toward minimum wage. Provides 1 hour paid sick leave per 30 hours worked for all employers, allows service fees to be pooled. Hinders future changes, by requiring a 2/3 council vote to modify. Competes with Measure CC; if both pass, the one with more votes prevails, but if Measure BB passes with less votes than CC, then any items in BB that are not directly in conflict with CC will still be implemented. Needs 50%+ 1 to pass.

CC – Minimum Wage – Initiative – NO: Labor-supported citizen initiative, raises minimum wage to $15 in 2017, annual COLA plus 3% from 2019 until reaching a living wage, with COLAs thereafter, with gradual increases for nonprofit youth employment & training agencies. Includes 1 hr of paid sick leave for every 30 hrs worked for small businesses; requires service fees go to the employee providing service. Competes with Measure BB (see above BB). Needs 50%+ 1 to pass.

DD – Rental Unit Business License Tax Initiative – NO, NO, NO: Bankrolled by Big Landlords to get themselves off the hook and confuse voters. Proponents spent $65,000 collecting signatures to get this on the ballot. Competes with Measure U1, but raises much less money. Creates new citizens panel to advise council how to increase affordable housing and protect tenants from homelessness. Taxes more landlords, with fewer exemptions, so Big Landlords pay less, includes hardship exemption. Increases cannot be passed to tenants. If both U1 and DD pass, the one with more votes prevails. Needs 50%+ 1 to pass.

Alameda County

A1 – Affordable Housing Bond – YES: Creates & protects affordable housing options for those who need it most: homeless, seniors, vets, disabled, & workers who cannot find affordable housing near their work in Alameda County. Raises up to $580 million, must be used in our county only, helps both renters and homeowners. Needs Supermajority (66.667%) to Pass.

Special Districts

E1 – Berkeley Schools: Educational Excellence Act of 2016 – YES: Renews parcel tax for 8 years. Known as BSEP, first passed in 1986, this tax now provides 20% of school budget. Funds smaller class sizes, enrichment programs, counseling and academic support, and teacher training. Tax is 37 cents per square foot of residential property, with annual cost-of-living increases. Exempts property occupied by very-low-income seniors. Needs Supermajority (66.667%) to Pass.

C1 – AC Transit – YES: Extends existing $8/month parcel tax at current level for 20 years — no increase in tax rate, raises approximately $30 million annually. Needs Supermajority (66.667%) to Pass.

RR – BART – YES: Would authorize BART to issue $3.5 billion bonds for repair and upgrade of aging tracks, tunnels, train control systems and other infrastructure. Needs Supermajority (66.667%) to Pass.

State Propositions

51 – School Bonds – leaning YES with reservations: $9 Billion price tag for school construction. Allows some funds to be used for charter schools. Broad support, polling well. Local bond measures are a better way to raise money for this purpose. Jerry Brown opposes. Needs Supermajority (66.667%) to Pass.

52 – State Fees on Hospitals –  YES with reservations: Protects use of Medi-Cal fees guaranteed to health services, draws matching federal dollars, so legislature can’t redirect to other purposes without 2/3 vote. Hospitals support. SEIU-UHW opposes.

53 – Revenue Bonds – NO: Stymies passage of big public work projects by forcing state to go to voters to borrow $2 billion or more. Bankrolled by wealthy central California farmer.

54 – Legislature – NO: Requires bills be available for public and legislative review at least 72 hours before voted on; written and funded by billionaire Charles Munger, but has the support of Common Cause, League of Women Voters and others proponents of good governance. Opposed by California Democratic Party, environmental and labor groups.

55 – Tax Extension to Fund Education & Healthcare – YES: Extends personal income tax for wealthier folk, to support community college, Cal State and Kindergarten through 12th grade funding.

56 – Cigarette Tax – YES: Increases cigarette tax to $2 per pack, equivalent increases on other tobacco products, e-cigs. First increase since tax was created. Funds health care, treatment and quit smoking programs. Broad support for this tax. Berkeley Community Health Commission recommended support. Opposed by Big Tobacco.

57 – Juvenile Criminal Sentences – YES: Increases parole and good behavior opportunities for those convicted of nonviolent crimes; allows judges, not prosecutors, to decide whether to try certain juveniles as adults.

58 – Bilingual Education – YES: Makes it easier for schools to establish bilingual programs for both English learners and native English speakers seeking to gain fluency in a foreign language.

59 – Overturn Citizens United – YES, YES, YES: Money out, Voters in. Instructs California’s elected officials at state and national level to act NOW to pass a 28th Amendment to US Constitution, end corrupt Super-PACS, end corporate constitutional rights and stop secret money in our elections.

60 – Adult Films – NO, with reservations: Modeled on L.A’s Measure B, this sounded good at 1st reading. Requires condoms in sex films, producers to register with state, pay for STD testing. Allows anyone to sue studios, distributors if condoms not used. Condoms already required for performers, but industry may ignore. Opponents (CA Democratic, Republican & Libertarian parties, performers group, SF AIDS Foundation) say performers and crew could be sued, might drive industry further underground; sets up proponent Michael Weinstein as “state’s porn czar, apparently for life”, per SJ Mercury.

61 – State Prescription Drug Purchases – YES: Prohibits state agencies from paying more for medications than US Veterans Affairs pays. Supported by Bernie’s Our Revolution. Opposed by Big Pharma.

62 – Death Penalty – YES, YES, YES! Repeals death penalty, replaces with life without parole, convicts must work in prison, more of their pay will be taken for restitution.

63 – Firearms – YES: Gavin Newsome’s gun control – Would prohibit possession of large-capacity ammunition magazines.

64 – Legalizes Marijuana – YES: Legalizes marijuana and hemp cultivation; enacts a 15 percent sales tax plus cultivation tax of $9.25/ounce for flowers and $2.75/ounce for leaves, with exceptions for medical marijuana. Prevents licenses for corporate or large-scale marijuana businesses for 5 years.

65 – Carry-Out Bags – NO:  The Fake Bag Ban. If Proposition 67 is approved, bag fees go to a special fund handled by state Wildlife Conservation Board, not retailers. Opponents say four out-of-state plastic bag companies who keep interfering with California’s efforts to reduce plastic pollution put this on the ballot.

66 – Death Penalty – NO, NO, NO: Opponents say this would make it harder to appeal death penalty. Opposition includes Ella Baker Center, labor groups, Exec board of Calif. Democratic Party, ACLU; sheriffs, police and district attorneys support.

67 – Veto Referendum to Overturn Bag Ban – YES, YES, YES: California Plastic Bag Ban Veto Referendum. Reaffirm the bag ban. A “YES” vote is a vote in favor of upholding the contested legislation banning plastic bags enacted by the Legislature under the SB270. Say NO to Big Plastic bag manufacturers, who oppose this.


These candidates have been endorsed by Berkeley Citizens Action, Berkeley Progressive Alliance and the Berkeley Tenants Union, during two endorsement events in April 2016; details of the ballot count for mayor and council candidates for April 30th can be found here. They were recently endorsed by the Wellstone Democratic Club.

Our Progressive candidates have raised significant amount of funds, but this election year is very competitive, as there is an opportunity to elect a progressive majority. Your contributions of money and time are very important. We urge you to DONATE to their campaigns, WALK IN THE NEIGHBORHOODS & CALL VOTERSCLICK THE LINKS ON CANDIDATES NAMES, BELOW, TO GET REACH THEIR WEBSITES. 


MAYOR: Jesse Arreguín. As mayor, “Jesse will bring our city together and get results, so Berkeley moves forward and carries on our tradition of progressive leadership.” A current Councilmember, Jesse has progressive vision and a record to back it up. As Mayor, he will work to tackle the affordability crisis by protecting and expanding affordable housing and preventing displacement, so Berkeley remains a diverse and vibrant place to live.


NanciCITY COUNCIL, DISTRICT 2: Nanci Armstrong-Temple, is committed to two things: Berkeley and Justice. She plans to fight for these as Berkeley City Council representative for District 2.” Nanci understands the unique landscape that makes up our small town, which is both diverse and complex. She believes that every resident of Berkeley has the right to experience a safe and equitable Berkeley, as well as responsive and ethical leadership.


BenCITY COUNCIL, DISTRICT 3: Ben Bartlettsays his “campaign is about responsive governmentinclusion, and environmental sustainability… Berkeley, like most places, has a growing gap between Opportunity and Affordability, and a deepening conflict between Prosperity and Sustainability. These are the issues of our times.”


sophieCITY COUNCIL, DISTRICT 5: Sophie Hahn, active in Berkeley since High School, Sophie’s “commitment to this community, and to causes that exemplify core Berkeley values, has been expressed through continuous leadership, advocacy and service.” As a member of the Zoning Adjustment Board, Sophie has been “the leading advocate for affordable housing and sensitivity to neighborhood concerns.”

FREDCITY COUNCIL, DISTRICT 6: Fred Dodswortha Berkeley resident since the mid-seventies, a journalist, teacher and former business owner with a lifelong commitment to the environment and social justice issues, Fred’s an independent candidate who will speak truth to power. Fred supports a living wage and affordable housing, will work to save Alta Bates and Herrick Hospitals, create real solutions to the homeless and mental health in our community and develop responsible transparent budgets.



On Sunday, April 26th, the 2016 Berkeley Tenants Convention endorsed the following candidates for a Pro-Tenant Slate for Rent BoardChristina Murphy, Leah Simon-Weisberg, Alejandro Soto-Vigil, Igor Tregub. Check back here for links to websites. CALI

How Berkeley Voted: 2016 June Primary Election

June 24, 2016                                                                         by Rob Wrenn

Bernie won Berkeley!

Photography Intern

Bernie Sanders won Berkeley in the Democratic presidential primary with 54.4% of the vote to 45.2% for Hillary Clinton, not a huge margin. Clinton did best in the City’s wealthiest areas, the northeast Berkeley hills in District 6, in the hills above Claremont Ave. in District 8, and in the windy street precincts in the northern part of District 5. These areas have historically favored “moderate” candidates in local Berkeley election.

Sanders swept the flatlands, except for two precincts in District 1, winning South Berkeley, West Berkeley and the central part of the city and sweeping the areas near the UC campus, Southside, Northside and Downtown by large margins. He did well in the areas where progressive candidates usually fare well in local elections.

Results by city and precinct:

Screen Shot 2016-06-24 at 7.42.36 PM.png

Note: Student precincts consists of precincts in the area south of campus between Dwight Way and campus and 1 consolidated precinct on the near Northside, that includes the Foothill dorm. Berkeley results include write-ins; Oakland, Albany and Emeryville and county results are based only on vote for candidates on the ballot.


Turnout Turnout in Berkeley was up this year compared to the uncontested 2012 California Democratic presidential primary, but was down compared to 2008 when Clinton ran against Obama for the nomination. In that hotly contested 2008 Democratic Presidential primary, which took place in February that year, turnout was 64.5% in Berkeley, with Obama defeating Clinton by a huge margin: 27,352 to 11,505. This year turnout was 58.0%.

Student turnout was very low, which is not surprising given that the primary took place after most undergraduates had left town for the summer. No doubt some students opted to register and vote in the hometowns they returned to when the semester ended.

This year, 833,803 people were registered to vote in Alameda County, and 49.3%, turned out to vote countywide. Of 480,475 registered Democrats in the county 59% voted. In addition, a little over table 140,000 Decline to State (DTS) voters cast Democratic ballots.

In Berkeley, 45,933 ballots were cast. In the 2014 November gubernatorial election, 40,301 votes were cast by Berkeley voters. 47,303 voted in the presidential primary election in 2008. A record 66,703 votes were cast in the 2008 November presidential election.

Turnout may have been dampened by media reports before the election that declared that Clinton had enough delegates, with super delegates included, to secure the nomination.

Turnout in Berkeley, Selected Elections, 2008-2016

Screen Shot 2016-06-24 at 7.46.55 PM

Trump gets less than 1% in Berkeley

The vast majority of the Berkeley voters’ ballots cast, 42,476, were cast in the Democratic primary. Donald Trump received 454 votes in the Republican primary; Kasich got 306. So Trump was supported by slightly less than 1% of the voters who cast ballots in Berkeley.

9th State Senate District

Former Assemblymember and District 1 councilmember Nancy Skinner easily beat Sandré Swanson in Berkeley, crushing him with 24,130 votes (62.6%) to Swanson’s 9596 votes(24.9% ). Other candidates got 4799 votes. Skinner swept every district in Berkeley. In the Oakland portion of the 9th District, Skinner beat Swanson by a much narrower margin of 44,012 to 40,650. Skinner and Swanson will face each other again in November.

Contra Costa County had not finished counting ballots as of June 22, but the 9th district result to date, including votes reported so far in Contra Costa County portions of the district is 48.0% for Skinner and 30.6% for Swanson.


June 9, 2016



Berkeley Citizens Action – June Newsletter

Competing Minimum Wage proposals, Police Review Commission with teeth and more.  Location: Council Chambers, 2135 Martin Luther King Jr. Way

Competing Minimum Wage measures on the November Ballot?
After years of intense debate on minimum wage, we face a chance of having two competing minimum wage ballot measures this November. After a resident initiated measure, the Council majority placed a competing measure that will likely cause serious voter confusion and lead to the failure of increasing to an equitable minimum wage.

Kriss Worthington writes that he has proposed for the June 14th Council meeting that Council adopt its own minimum wage proposal as an ordinance rather than create voter confusion in November. 

Mike Donaldson from SEIU and the Central Labor Council has asked for support from BCA member for their minimum wage initiative, which would lift the minimum wage to $15 on October 1st, 2017. He explains that their measure means minimum  of more than $3,000 a year in income for a full-time worker, more sick leave, fewer restrictions, better wage theft protections, more income for youth, less confusion, and does not allow the City Council to arbitrarily change provisions. Attached please find links to the minimum wage flyer for June 14th council meeting and their community minimum wage initiative.

Other items of interest on the June 14 docket:
33.  Petition President Barack Obama to Grant Clemency to Leonard Peltier
35.  Honor the East Bay Sanctuary Covenant for its 3000th Asylum Grant
50.  Ballot Measure to Lower the Voting Age of School Board Elections to Sixteen
   …and many more!

Please attend June 14, but don’t wait until then to contact the mayor and council about items you support or oppose on the council agenda: Here is the link to the city council agenda for next Tuesday, and the emails for council and city clerk:

Game-changer for police accountability in Berkeley?

Submitted by George Lippman
Item 52, from Kriss Worthington is a proposal for a November ballot initiative to establish a true Police Commission with teeth. Unlike the current Police Review Commission, the new body would have full oversight powers over the BPD. Location:  2134 MLK Jr. Way, Berkeley. Click here to see the proposal

Item 52 would refer the current Oakland community proposal for a similar Police Commission to the city manager to draft a charter amendment to be considered by the voters. There is not yet Berkeley-specific language, and the floor is open for your ideas.

Please review the item in the agenda packet including the Oakland language and come out June 14 to voice your support, giving input into how the Commission should function.

You might consider these questions:
* How is the current role of the PRC insufficient to provide oversight and transparency for Berkeley police?
* Would the Oakland model provide sufficient independence for the commission?
* Is the Selection Panel described in the model ordinance the appropriate way to select some of the commissioners?
* Are the scope and procedures of investigations appropriate?

Beyond the June 14 meeting, if the referral does pass, I believe there will have to be a second vote (July?) to review the City Manager’s language and decide whether to put it on the November ballot.  There will be a need for community mobilization at that point, and for a strong campaign through the fall to win the vote.

Other upcoming accountability initiatives:
*  Racial profiling:  new statistics from this year have been released by the BPD which shows that the biased patterns revealed last year continue into 2016.  The PRC has established a subcommittee to look into this issue, and community people are invited to participate.
*  Body cameras:  new policy draft will be finalized at the June 8 PRC meeting, 7pm, South Berkeley Senior Center.
*  Crowd control:  ongoing PRC subcommittee meetings on use of force, mutual aid, etc.
*  Privacy/surveillance ordinance, using the ACLU template as modified for Berkeley (as in Oakland, Richmond, Santa Clara County etc.)


Come to tonight’s Berkeley Council meeting on Housing, Tonight Tuesday May 17

Talking Points for speaking out or an email
Subject: Affordable Housing, May 17 meeting
Dear Mayor Bates and Members of the Berkeley City Council,
     The City of Berkeley is facing a housing affordability crisis. To address this crisis, the City Council must adopt an affordable housing funding plan. An achievable and effective plan could add at least $10 million each year to the Housing Trust Fund. The City should commit to measures that will help fund at least 100 more units of affordable housing every year. In addition to housing impact fees, please support the following measures:
1. A ballot measure to increase the business license tax on landlords with five or more units in Berkeley, with an increase sufficient to generate at least $4 million a year in new revenue for the Housing Trust Fund. Please don’t support watered down alternatives such as what is being proposed by landlord lobbyists.
2.Taxing short-term rentals like AirBnB and making sure the revenue is committed to the Housing Trust Fund
3. Using 25% of any Property Transfer Tax revenues over $10.5 million for affordable housing by placing the money in the Housing Trust Fund.
4. A countywide affordable housing bond on the November 2016 ballot
These measures would begin to produce adequate funding for the housing we need for families, students and working people.  We urge you as our City Council representatives to adopt these measures to both increase the resources in the Housing Trust Fund and to guarantee additional affordable housing in the future.

Results of Endorsement Meeting held by BPA- BCA-BTU on Saturday April 30th

Endorsement Results:

Mayor: Jesse Arreguin               District 2: Nanci Armstrong-Temple

District 3: Ben Bartlett                District 5: Sophie Hahn

District 6: Fred Dodsworth


Mayor: 109 valid ballots counted, one invalid. Jesse Arreguin achieved 60% threshhold on first round of rank choice counting

Jesse Arreguin 65%                         Kriss Worthington 24%

Mike Lee: 4%                                     Ben Gould: 3%

Write ins: 2 for Kate Harrison, 1 for Moni Law                                      No endorsement: 2%

Total votes for Jesse Arreguin for 1st, 2nd or 3rd choice: 97. Total votes for Kriss Worthington for 1st, 2nd or 3rd choice: 74


District 2 City Council – 98 valid ballots. Nanci Armstrong-Temple achieved 61% after ranked choices were counted

Nanci Armstrong-Temple: 61%          Cheryl Davila: 26%          No Endorsement    13%


District 3 City Council – 103 valid ballots  (3 invalid ballots): Endorsement goes to Ben Bartlett, who achieved 87% on first round of rank choice counting

Ben Bartlett: 87%                          Mark Coplan: 12%               Deborah Matthews: 1%                     No endorsement   0


District 5 City Council – 85 Valid ballots: Sophie Hahn achieved 78.9% on first round of rank choice counting

Sophie Hahn 78 91%                Stephen Murphy: 6%               No endorsement: 2%


District 6 City Council – 94 valid ballots, 2 invalid: Endorsement goes to Fred Dodsworth achieved 78.9% on first round of rank choice counting

Fred Dodsworth: 78%               Isabelle Gaston: 9%                 Susan Wengraf: 5%                             No Endorsement: 9%

Ten Candidates have requested progressive endorsement for Mayor and City Council

These Ten Candidates have submitted questionnaires about their candidacy and will speak at the April 30th Endorsement Meeting. Join us Saturday April 30th from 1:30 to 5 at the Youth Adult Project (YAP) at 1730 Oregon Street. Click here to download the current flyer.

To vote in the endorsement meeting you must be a member of BPA or Berkeley Citizens Action or the Berkeley Tenants Union by April 24th. Each group will have membership lists at the registration tables at the event. Members can bring dues current there. No one will be turned away due to lack of funds. If needed, as during registration.

All candidates who are registered with the city or requested consideration were sent the following questionnaire. Do Candidates support our Progressive Agenda & Housing Platform? See their responses summarized in this corrected document here. Below you may click on candidates name’s to access their full responses.

Mayor:  Jesse Arreguin    Ben Gould     Mike Lee    Kriss Worthington

City Council District 2:  Cheryl K. Davila        Nanci Armstrong-Temple

City Council District 3:   Ben Bartlett              Mark Coplan

City Council District 5:   Sophie Hahn

City Council District 6:   Fred Dodsworth

Click here for Draft Voting Rules and Ballots. This will be updated when finalized.

The following local measures are under way for the November 2016 ballot: Local measures & Rent Board Slate Update.